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   ► KBTo/From GuidesDelphi Prism  Print This     

String Concatenation

Delphi Prism:   +

Unlike Delphi, Prism performs implicit casting. To concatenate two strings, a string to an integer, or a string to a floating point number, use the + operator. For example, to convert a floating point number to a string just concatenate an empty string to the number as in "" + 3.2.

Alternatively, you can use the System.Text.StringBuilder class which frequently but not always provides faster code.

Syntax Example:
var FirstName : String;
var LastName : String;
  
FirstName := 'Mike';
LastName := 'Prestwood';
ShowMessage('Full name: ' + FirstName + ' ' + LastName);
  
//Implicit casting of numbers.
//
//This fails:
//MessageBox.Show(3.3);
//
//This works:
MessageBox.Show("" + 3.3);




Cross Reference Examples:

Access VBA:  "String Concatenation" & or +

Although you can use either a & or a + to concatenate values, my preference is to use a + because more languages use it. However, if you use & then some type conversions are done for you. If you use + you will sometimes have to cast a value to concatenate it. For example, you will have to use CStr to cast a number to a string if you use the + operator as a concatenation operator.

Syntax Example:
Dim FirstName As String
Dim LastName As String
 
FirstName = "Mike"
LastName = "Prestwood"
 
MsgBox "Full name: " & FirstName & " " & LastName
 
MsgBox "2+2=" + CStr(2+2)
ASP Classic:  "String Concatenation" & or +

Although you can use either a & or a + to concatenate values, my preference is to use a + because more languages use it. However, if you use & then some type conversions are done for you. If you use + you will sometimes have to cast a value to concatenate it. For example, you will have to use CStr to cast a number to a string if you use the + operator as a concatenation operator.

Syntax Example:
Dim FirstName
Dim LastName
 
FirstName  = "Mike"
LastName  = "Prestwood"
 
Response.Write "Full name: " & FirstName & " " + LastName
 
Response.Write "2+2=" + CStr(2+2)
C#:  "String Concatenation" +

C# performs implicit casting of numbers to strings. To concatenate two strings, a string to an integer, or a string to a floating point number, use the + operator. For example, to convert a floating point number to a string just concatenate an empty string to the number as in "" + 3.2.

Alternatively, you can use the System.Text.StringBuilder class which frequently but not always provides faster code.

Syntax Example:
String FirstName;
String LastName;
Int16 Age;
FirstName = "Mike";
LastName = "Prestwood";
Age = 43;
Console.WriteLine(FirstName + " " + LastName + " is " + Age + ".");
  
//Implicit casting of numbers.
//
//This fails:
//MessageBox.Show(3.3);
//
//This works:
MessageBox.Show("" + 3.3); 
C++:  "String Concatenation" + or append

The + operator can be used with any combination of C++ strings, C strings and characters.

Syntax Example:
string fullname;

fullname = "Mike ";
fullname.append("Prestwood");

cout << "Hello " + fullname + "." << endl;
C++/CLI:  "String Concatenation" +

C++/CLI performs implicit casting of numbers to strings. To concatenate two strings, a string to an integer, or a string to a floating point number, use the + operator. For example, to convert a floating point number to a string just concatenate an empty string to the number as in "" + 3.2.

Alternatively, you can use the System.Text.StringBuilder class which frequently but not always provides faster code.

Syntax Example:  
//Implicit casting of numbers.
//
//This fails:
//MessageBox::Show(3.3);
//
//This works:
MessageBox::Show("" + 3.3);
Corel Paradox:  "String Concatenation" +

String literals s are limited to 255 characters but you can simply add two strings together as in:

s = "A long string." + "Another long string."
Syntax Example:
var
FirstName  String
  LastName  String
endVar
 
FirstName  = "Mike"
LastName  = "Prestwood"
msgInfo("", "Full name: " + FirstName + " " + LastName)
Delphi:  "String Concatenation" +

Use the + operator to concatenate two strings. Use IntToStr to convert an integer to a string and FloatToStr to convert a floating point number to a string.

Syntax Example:
var 
  FirstName : String; 
  LastName : String;
begin 
  FirstName := 'Mike'; 
  LastName := 'Prestwood';
  ShowMessage('Full name: ' + FirstName + ' ' + LastName);
  
  ShowMessage(FloatToStr(3.2));
end;
Java:  "String Concatenation" + or append

In Java, you use either the String concatenation + operator or StringBulder class methods such as append. Since Java compilers frequently create intermediate objects when the + operator is used and don't when StringBuilder.append is used, the append method is faster than the + operator.

In general, use the convenience of a + operator when speed is not an issue. For example, when concatenating a small number of items and when code isn't executed very frequently. A decent rule of thumb is to use the + operator for general purpose programming and then optimize the + operator with StringBuilder.append as needed.

Syntax Example:

Simple + operator example:

System.out.println("Hello" + " " + "Mike.");

 

Using StringBuilder example:

StringBuilder myMsg = new StringBuilder();

myMsg.append("Hello ");
myMsg.append("Mike.");
 
System.out.println(myMsg);
JavaScript:  "String Concatenation" +

To concatenate two strings, a string to an integer, or a string to a floating point number, use the + operator. JavaScript performs implicit casting when concatenating a string and a number. For example, to convert a floating point number to a string just concatenate an empty string to the number as in "" + 3.2.

Syntax Example:
 
// -->
Perl:  "String Concatenation" .

Perl uses a period (.) known as a dot to concatenate strings.

Syntax Example:
$fname = "Mike";
$lname = "Prestwood";

$fullname = $fname . $lname . "
";

print "My name is " . "Mike.
";
PHP:  "String Concatenation" .

PHP uses a period (.) known as a dot to concatenate strings.

Syntax Example:
$fname = "Mike";
$lname = "Prestwood";

$fullname = $fname . $lname . "
";

echo "My name is " . "Mike.
";
VB Classic:  "String Concatenation" & or +

Although you can use either a & or a + to concatenate values, my preference is to use a + because more languages use it. However, if you use & then some type conversions are done for you. If you use + you will sometimes have to cast a value to concatenate it. For example, you will have to use CStr to cast a number to a string if you use the + operator as a concatenation operator.

Syntax Example:
Dim FirstName As String
Dim LastName As String
 
FirstName = "Mike"
LastName = "Prestwood"
 
MsgBox "Full name: " & FirstName & " " + LastName
 
MsgBox "2+2=" + CStr(2+2)
VB.Net:  "String Concatenation" + or &

To concatenate two strings, use either the + or & operators. The & operator implicitly converts numbers. If you use the + operator to concatenate a string and a number, you have to cast the number as a string with CStr.

Alternatively, you can use the System.Text.StringBuilder class which frequently but not always provides faster code.

Syntax Example:
Dim FullName
Dim Age
  
//You can use + for strings.
FullName = "Prestwood"
Console.WriteLine("Hello " + FullName)
 
//For implicit casting, use &
Age = 35
Console.WriteLine(FullName & " is " & Age & " years old.")
'Implicit casting of numbers.
'
'This works:
MessageBox.Show(3.3)
  
'This fails:
'MessageBox.Show("" + 3.3)
  
'This works:
MessageBox.Show("" + CStr(3.3))
  
'Implicit casting &. This also works:
MessageBox.Show("" & 3.3)




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